Our research focuses on the characterization of physical properties and structures of materials through thermodynamic, transport, X-ray and neutron measurements, with an emphasis on the design, synthesis and crystal growth of new materials. Our interests span a wide spectrum of materials, from intermetallics to oxides, especially superconductors and strongly correlated electron systems showing unusual electronic and magnetic ground states that can be perturbed by chemical doping, applied pressure or magnetic field. We aim at synthesizing new materials with nontrivial properties, characterizing quantum phases, and examining the different energy scales in solids. The interplay of magnetism, superconductivity and structure will be of particular interest.

Read more about our research.

 

Recent news

07/2020 Check out the news on our discovery of intrinsic magnetic topological insulators MnBi4Te7 and MnBi8Te13.
https://www.physicalsciences.ucla.edu/news/

07/2020 Our work on the discovery of the first intrinsic ferromagnetic axion topological insulator MnBi8Te13 is published on Science Advances. Congrats to Chaowei, Scott, and Jinyu!
https://advances.sciencemag.org/content/6/30/eaba4275

07/2020 Our work on a Kitaev material candidate YbCl3 is published on Physical Review B. Congrats to Jie!
https://journals.aps.org/prb/pdf/10.1103/PhysRevB.102.014427

06/2020 Our work on EuAg4As2 with an incommensurate non-collinear magnetic structure is published on Physical Review Materials. Congrats to Bing and Chaowei!
https://journals.aps.org/prmaterials/pdf/10.1103/PhysRevMaterials.4.064419

06/2020  Thanks for the continuous support of our research, DOE!
06/2020  Eve successfully defended her thesis. Congratulations, Dr. Emmanouilidou! We are so proud of you.
02/2020 Ni gave invited talks at MIT and Harvard one week before the breakout of COVID19 at Boston.

01/2020 Chaowei's work on the discovery of a Z2 antiferromagnetic topological insulator MnBi4Te7 with weak interlayer magnetic coupling is published on Nature Communications. Congrats! https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-019-13814-x